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Luftschiff Hoch!
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PaxAeternum
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Artist | Professional | Varied
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My dear friend Conrad Milster, and his wonderland of humankind's ageless dreams. I cherish this man and his work, someone I owe very much to and someone I profoundly respect. Hopefully I will see him and the engine house again this may, and hopefully that engine house will still be in good order when I go. I am terrified it may soon vanish away where all the things I love seem to go.   I beg of all of you who read this, do not let these dreams die.  Conrad represents someone who has largely succeeded where I have thusfar failed, I need to continue what he does and I need to make what he protects my own, and safe.   I am never so inspired as when I am inside the warm walls of his power plant.........


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:iconsteamrailwaycompany:
SteamRailwayCompany Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Hobbyist Writer
Dear Mr. Karnes,

As much as I'm aware that you despise America, and I hope you'll understand that I'm not trying to instigate an unintelligent argument with you, in case you have any family members who have served, I wish you a happy memorial day…. :flagus: 
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:iconccmarc:
CCMarc Featured By Owner May 17, 2015
OH YEAH

MR. KARNES
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:iconsteamrailwaycompany:
SteamRailwayCompany Featured By Owner May 14, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
What is the purpose of having the line of the smokebox curve outwards towards the running plate and/or cylinders, such as on the Stirling Single, Duke Class, and this tank engine built for the Nippon Railway? www.gracesguide.co.uk/images/8…
Was it an easier arrangement for the steam pipes?
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:iconpaxaeternum:
PaxAeternum Featured By Owner May 16, 2015  Professional General Artist
To be honest it is mostly an aesthetic decision.  That being said it does increase the smokebox volume and of course the more volume there is in the smokebox the more efficiently the locomotive can run because of a larger reservoir of vacuum being present.   That being said, a locomotive with a non-circular smokebox is much harder to clean of ashes and soot because it has to be lifted up to the door rather than just swept out.     I actually prefer the swept smokebox look, the stirling single has it, the SAR class 7A has it, etcetera.  I do not so much like it when the locomotive smokebox has only a front plate to deliniate such a shape but does not follow the extrusion, such things are found on the Caledonian singles and Dunalastairs and such
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:iconsteamrailwaycompany:
SteamRailwayCompany Featured By Owner Edited May 5, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
Why were there, as it seems, so few tender engines with side tanks, when obviously it would increase refueling range and add to adhesive weight?
One of the few cases that I've ever found of tender engines with side tanks were a few British built locos for the Imperial Japanese Government Railways. kotenki.cocolog-nifty.com/loco…
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:iconpaxaeternum:
PaxAeternum Featured By Owner May 10, 2015  Professional General Artist
Increasing the range was a good idea, however there are problems.  For one you increase the amount of flexible plumbing between the engine and tender two-fold, as you need at least one communication hose to keep the levels the same in both tanks and this hose has to be fairly large, that being one that can transfer water between the two faster than the injectors or pumps use it out of any given tank.    For two there is the gradient translation issue.  Let us say both tanks are full and then you go up a hill, the water in the locomotive tanks transfers to the tender tank which begins overflowing out its lid or air-displacement vents, and vise-versa on the locomotive's tanks whenever you go down a hill.  THis problem could be avoided by shutting a valve on the communication hose between the two, but I do not see a driver or fireman being able to close and open this valve and remember to do it every time when starting and finishing a gradient.   
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:iconsteamrailwaycompany:
SteamRailwayCompany Featured By Owner May 11, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
Maybe such engines were used on the IJGR because they didn't have gradients much more severe than those of British railways, considering Japan's mountainous terrain. 
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:iconpaxaeternum:
PaxAeternum Featured By Owner May 19, 2015  Professional General Artist
that would make sense, however every railway has gradients and Japan is very mountainous as you said, so I don't know.   Float-valves would be another way of correcting the problem however I am not sure if they were used on these locomotives.
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:iconccmarc:
CCMarc Featured By Owner May 4, 2015
Hey man, how's it going?
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:iconpaxaeternum:
PaxAeternum Featured By Owner May 5, 2015  Professional General Artist
send money, that's how.
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